Catapulting into Digital Fabrication – SCOPES Digital Fabrication

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Author

Sue Williamson
Sue Williamson
K-12 teacher
Dr. Sue Williamson has been a classroom educator for 17 years and has a   Doctorate in Educational Administration from Georgia Southern University. Sue spent 13 years in Georgia as a gifted endorsed teacher of middle grades english/ language arts,… Read More

Summary

This lesson will introduce students to the essential concepts underlying the principles of 2 dimensional dynamics in a gravitational field. Along with the study of dynamics, students will construct either medieval catapult, ball free throw, or custom launching device and use qualitative data to analyze the two dimensional motion of a projectile in Earth’s gravitational field. Students will use digital fabrication in the final designs and document their process using video documentaries. Students will then demonstrate their design process, final design, and functionality of the launching device in a Catapult Challenge Competition.

What You'll Need

Cardboard

Hot Glue

Scissors,

Pencils,

Rulers,

Protractors,

Duct Tape,

String

Rubber Bands

Soda Bottle Cap

Small Bouncy Balls

MDF

CARVEY

Chip board

Laser Cutter

The Instructions

Office Supply Catapult

As an introduction, students will construct a catapult designed and built out of pencils and other common office supplies.

Follow the directions to build a catapult using office supplies.

https://www.instructables.com/id/office-supply-catapult/

3 D Design of Catapult

As a first prototype, students will use 3D software to design a launching device.

  1. Standard orthographic drawing (Blueprint) created on graph paper –

4 drawing images: http://www.technologystudent.com/designpro/ortho1.htm

  • Isometric view (full view)
  • Top (Plan) view
  • Front view
  • Side view
  • Include dimensions/measurements for each view
  • Sketch and measurements MUST match the design of the cardboard prototype in Step 2.

Cardboard Prototype

Small scale 3D model, no bigger than 8 inch cube Materials: Cardboard, string, 2 dowels, glue, rubber bands, springs Functionality - swinging arm, carries an approved payload (marshmallows/ping pong ball) Structurally sound - self-standing structure Catapult only: frame and base, fulcrum, swing arm, payload in basket, spring/torsion device.

  • Small scale 3D model, no bigger than 8 inch cube
  • Materials: Cardboard, string, 2 dowels, glue, rubber bands, springs
  • Materials are found in the Commons from Mr. Vanzant
  • Functionality – swinging arm, carries an approved payload (marshmallows/ping pong ball)
  • Structurally sound – self-standing structure
  • Catapult only: frame and base, fulcrum, swing arm, payload in basket, spring/torsion device

Chip Board Scale Model

As a second iteration, students will scale up and adjust the previous design to build a better performing device.

  1. Catapult Design Chipboard Requirements:
  • Create pieces printed to Laser Cutter/Carvey from 2D top view in Easel or other compatible software.
  • Small scale 3D model, no bigger than 12 inch cube
  • Materials: chipboard, fasteners, dowels, string, springs, glue, tape
  • Functionality – a swinging arm, carries a payload
  • Structurally sound – self-standing
  • Catapult only: frame and base, fulcrum, swing arm, payload in basket, spring/torsion device

Optional - MDF Scale Model

As an option, students can continue to refine their design and construct their device out of MDF using a laser cutter.

Catapult Design Fiberboard Carvey Requirements:

  • Create pieces to print on the Carvey using Easel software from 2D top view in TinkerCAD
  • Small scale 3D model, no bigger than 12 inch cube
  • Materials: fiberboard, fasteners, dowels, string, springs, glue, tape
  • Functionality – a swinging arm, carries a payload
  • Structurally sound – self-standing
  • Catapult only: frame and base, fulcrum, swing arm, payload in basket, spring/torsion device

Standards

  • (HSA.CED.A1): Create equations and inequalities in one variable and use them to solve problems. Include equations arising from linear and quadratic functions, and simple rational and exponential functions.
  • (HSA.CED.A4): Rearrange formulas to highlight a quantity of interest, using the same reasoning as in solving equations. For example, rearrange Ohm's law V = IR to highlight resistance R.

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  1. SCOPES-DF March 8, 2019
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